Day 10: Ignorance of Our Neighbors

Graduate students in the sciences were challenged to translate their research into a prayer of confession—to communicate how the work their doing in creation is addressing the brokenness we see around. And we invite you to join in.

O God, who cares for the poor and for creation, we bring our lament for the harm that is done by kerosene that is burned to light people’s homes around the world. We confess that we have not known or cared for our global neighbors. O Lord, we long for a world where people can light their homes with energy that is safe, renewable, and reliable. May the work we do and the lives that we live bring that day closer. In the name of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. Amen.

A prayer of confession from the Au Sable Graduate Fellows

Questions & Activities

  • How does this prayer resonate with you?
  • There are many products and systems we use in our own homes, or that are wildly used around the world, which are harmful for both the environment and human health. In addition to kerosene for light, wood stoves are a common element of homes around the world. When the stove is poorly constructed, it leads to incomplete combustion, which contributes to pollution, carbon monoxide poisoning, asthma, and other medical conditions. You can see the National Institutes of Health’s own research on this. Read that, or look for other issues of ecological degradation that you were unaware of in the news headlines.
  • Write your own prayer of confession around the theme of ignorance—those wild and untamed places in the world. It may look something like this: O God, who created us to love and know one another, and who constantly works to bring to light what is in the darkness, we bring our lament for [how do you lament your own ignorance of ecological issues in your own home and around the world? Consider news headlines you found]. We confess [what are some ways we are culpable for this ignorance?]. O Lord, we long for a world [what is your hope for change?]. Amen.
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